Testbirds Webinar with Deutsche Telekom: How professional Testing can improve the world of IoT

The Internet of Things (IoT) is well under way to become a really big thing: newspapers publish articles about IoT more and more frequently, people talk about their newest IoT product and how they recognize that IoT products enter our daily lives. Testbirds also already talked about the exciting field of IoT within an article on our Testbirds Blog. Last time, we gave a short overview about IoT in general and why it is important to test IoT products properly by using crowdtesting. Today, we want to add some interesting and remarkable numbers and statistics about the Internet of Things:

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Internet of Things – What it is all about and how you can use the power of the crowd to test it

Wouldn’t it be great if your refrigerator could be aware of all the food you need and mail the grocery list to your smartphone while you are on the way to the supermarket? Sounds like science fiction, but this can be a reality in the world of the so-called Internet of Things (IoT). But what exactly do we mean when talking about IoT? Kevin Ashton, a British technology pioneer, coined the term “the Internet of Things” in 1999 to describe a system where the Internet is connected to the physical world via ubiquitous sensors. And the international consultancy McKinsey created a definition saying that the Internet of Things consists of “sensors and actuators embedded in physical objects that are linked through wired and wireless networks, often using the same Internet Protocol that connects the Internet”. What seemed to be a vision of the future in 1999, can now be found in our homes and our daily life, for example in the field of smart home products like smart light bulbs, connected toothbrushes and coffee machines. Furthermore, there are gadgets like virtual reality glasses, headsets, and cameras. In addition, some close friends, or even you yourself, might wear a smartwatch or drive a connected car. These are just a few IoT-products human beings use daily and there are many more entering the market every day.
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